Monday, October 26, 2009

Honey and Cinnamon as a natural antibiotic to fight colds/flu



Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacteria and viral attacks. Scientists have found that honey has various vitamins and iron in large amounts. Constant use of honey strengthens the white blood corpuscles to fight bacteria and viral diseases.

To make a tea- 1 Teaspoon of honey, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, 8oz warm water


Some more amazing benefits of Cinnamon

Cinnamon is one of the oldest know spices. Cinnamon is a small tree that grows in India, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Brazil, Vietnam, and Egypt. It has innumerable benefit that has been recognized since the start of natural medicine in India. Cinnamon come in many forms from sticks that the bark has been dried and rolled into, which is also called quills as well as it can be dried and grounded into a powder. Regardless its form cinnamon is beneficial to mankind.

Studies have shown that just 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon per day can lower LDL cholesterol.

Several studies suggest that cinnamon may have a regulatory effect on blood sugar, making it wspecially beneficail for people with Type 2 diabetes.

Cinnamon has an anti-clotting effect on the blood.

In a study published by researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture in Maryland, cinnamon reduced the proliferation of leukemia and lymphoma cancer cells.

Researchers at Kansas State University found that cinnamon fights the E. Coli bacteria in unpasteurized juices.

Another study found that by smelling cinnamon it boosts cognitive function and memory.

When cinnamon is added to food, it inhibits bacterial growth and food spoilage, making it a natural food preservative.

And, in some studies, cinamon has shown the ability to stop medication-resistant yeast infections.



Honey in Wound Management
Significant research is being carried out to study the benefits of honey in treating wounds. The benefits of honey in wound management. These have been given below:
Honey possesses antimicrobial properties.
It helps in promoting autolytic debridement.
It deodorizes malodorous wounds.
It speeds up the healing process by stimulating wound tissues.
It helps in initiating the healing process in dormant wounds.
Honey also helps in promoting moist wound healing.

The healing powers of honey are not hyped. The Waikato Honey Research Unit provides details about the world-wide research that is being carried out on the benefits of honey in medicine. Further, BBC reported in July, 2006 that doctors at the Christie Hospital in Didsbury, Manchester are planning to use honey for faster recovery of cancer patients after surgery.


Honey contains antioxidants,powerful compounds which fight free radicals and reverse ageing.

A study conducted in 2004 by the University of California concluded that honey contains as many antioxidants as spinach, apples, oranges or strawberries.

All varieties of honey are rich in amino acids. One study has found that the level of amino acids present in honey is a reliable indicator of the honey's antioxidant capacity.

Amino acids are the basic building blocks of life, essential to our very existence. When you examine the various properties and benefits of each amino acid, you will start to form a clearer picture as to why honey is so beneficial.

Tryptophan:


A natural relaxant, it helps alleviate insomnia by inducing normal sleep. It reduces anxiety and depression, relieves migraine headaches, boosts immune system, reduces the risk of artery and heart spasms, and works with Lysine to reduce cholesterol levels.

Lysine:

It is one of the essential amino acids - your body cannot generate its own Lysine, meaning you must get it from your diet.

Recent studies have shown that Lysine may be effective against herpes by improving the balance of nutrients that reduce viral growth. Prolonged stressful situations increase our requirements for Lysine and it is important in the formation of collagen (the protein that forms the matrix of your bone, cartilage and connective tissue).

Methionine:

Another essential sulfur amino acids. As with other essential amino acids, you do not create your own so you must ingest it for survival.

Contributes to the formation of important compounds in your body and works as a sulfur donor to aid in your body's detoxification processes.

Cysteine:

Functions as an antioxidant and protects the body against radiation and pollution.

Histidine:


Another essential amino acid and is delivered mostly from our diets.

It has anti-inflammatory properties and is the only amino acid found to be consistently low in the blood of those with rheumatoid arthritis.

Glutamine:

This essential amino acid plays a key role in the metabolism and the gastrointestinal tract. It is the primary energy source for the cells that line your intestines and is essential to keeping them healthy.

It is considered also to be a brain food by improving mental capacity. It may also help speed the healing of ulcers and reduce fatigue.

Tyrosine:

Tyrosine is a natural mood enhancer due to its ability to convert to feel-good neurotransmitters norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain. It helps with depression. It also may convert to thyroid hormone and to adrenaline which is produced by your adrenal gland in response to stress.

It may come as a surprise to many people, but honey is an excellent source of vitamins.

Honey contains a variety of vitamins and minerals. The vitamin and mineral content of honey depends on the type of flowers used for agriculture. When bees are allowed free forage, the honey blend is higher in a wider variety of vitamins and minerals.

Honey is high in vitamin C, a variety of B vitamins such as niacin, riboflavin, and pantothenic acid, as well as, minerals such as potassium.

More honey information can be found at http://www.amazing-green-tea.com/honey-nutrition.html

No comments: